Excess objects

Hi,

A. Where can I find more information about the use of components? For example the activity diagram, things like ‘Activity’, ‘Action’ and ‘Swimlane’ are clear and documented in most UML documents. But I cannot find any reference of what a “Interruptible Activity Region” is suppose to be. I could take a good guess based on the name, but I would like some more information about these objects.
This is also the case with other diagrams.

B. Can I disable them? Some of the analyst are confused about ites that are not used.

Best regards,
Marqui

Hi Marqui,

Thanks for your post. According to section 12.3.33 InterruptibleActivityRegion in UML Superstructure Specification v2.2 (which you can download from http://www.omg.org/docs/formal/09-02-02.pdf ):
“An interruptible activity region is an activity group that supports termination of tokens flowing in the portions of an activity.”
Description
An interruptible region contains activity nodes. When a token leaves an interruptible region via edges designated by the
region as interrupting edges, all tokens and behaviors in the region are terminated.”

Attached is the example in the UML Superstructure Specification v2.2 regarding to Interruptible Activity Region.

To disable specific model elements, we are sorry that currently we do not support. But this is on our list and it’s planned to be available in next release, i.e. VP-UML 7.1 which is expected to be released on September this year.

Hope these help. Please let me know if you have any further inquiry.

Best regards,
Lilian Wong

example_of_InterruptibleActivityRegion.png

Hi,

Thank you very much.
So there is no Visual-Paradigm specific help, we need to use the UML specs as reference?

Best regards,
Marqui

Hi Marqui,

Thanks for replying. We are sorry that our Help does not covers the definition of each model type, but we fully follow UML Superstructure Specification v2.2 so users can refer to the UML Specification for details (definition, notation, attributes, etc.) about each model type.

Best regards,
Lilian Wong